Fun with Google Scribe

Google Scribe (in Google Labs) tries to help make writing easier and better by using predictive text suggestions. These go beyond regular finish the word suggestions, and can actually suggest the next word. I assume this must be based on their index of commonly occurring word that are adjacent. So I was wondering what would Google Scribe write if always take the suggested next word? What kind of inspiration would it provide after I choose the starting word?

Inspiration for the design of the study was to determine the effect of the drug in the treatment of the subject matter of the present invention is to provide a method for the determination of the amount of the compound of formula I wherein R is a hydrogen atom or a methyl group at the University of California at Berkeley and the University of California at Berkeley and the University of California at Berkeley and the University of California at Berkeley . . . .

When I gave it the starting word “Inspiration” it assumed I was writing a paper about a study on a drug at the University of California Berkeley, and they got stuck in a recursive loop. What if I try a different word?

Writing and Editing Professional in Human Resources Management and Development of the National Association of Realtors and the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the Arts and Crafts movement in the United States and Canada for the first time in the future and the future of the country and the world of the living room and dining room with a view to the sea and the mountains of the world and the world of the living room and dining room with a view to the sea and the mountains of the world . . . .

Not sure where it was going with that one. I gave it the word “Writing” and it started talking about organizations and departments and countries then got in a weird loop about rooms with views . . . It doesn’t seem that it will ever suggest punctuation, which leads to run on sentences. I wonder what Scibe wants to say about “Google” . . .

Google Earth and Google Maps to find the best deals on the best way to get the best of the best in the world of the living room and dining room with a view to the sea and the mountains of the world and the world of the living room . . .

Interesting that it listed Google Earth and Google Maps specifically, but then got stuck in the room with a view loop again. It clearly isn’t looking only at word pairs since Google would have matched Earth both times, but at the same time the context is shorter in other situations since it really likes that room with a view loop.

It does have an option to give multiple suggestions, so the user could steer the conversation in different directions. Plus the addition of the occasional period would allow for the introduction of new chains of thought.

Conclusion: It does look at more than just the previous word, but still can get stuck in a recursive loop. No punctuation is suggested. It is clearly still a labs toy, but I’ve seen predictive correction before that works, so this may evolve and show up in more places. You can install the extension today and play with it on your favorite web text box.